The Beginnings

Welcome to the inaugural post of my blog How to Ed Tech. The purpose of this blog is to provide some real world reviews and guides to incorporating technology into the classroom. First, some background on myself and how I got here.

My technology passion started at a young age. I blame my father. He was a techie and we had a TI-99 computer. I remember playing Tunnels of Doom with him for hours. We then progressed to a Packard Bell 486, where I played 7th Guest with him for hours. Many hours later, I built my own computer when I was 16. When I turned 18, I got a job at my geek heaven, Fry’s Electronics. I worked there four 5 years as a returns associate fixing people’s computers when they didn’t know how to build them. I still think I can put together a computer blind folded. Today, I am an rather early adopter of tech toys. I have too many computers (at least according to my wife), tablets that run Android, iOS, and my personal favorite WebOS ( You gave up too early HP. You marketed the TouchPad wrong with too high of a price point). I also have numerous other tech gadgets, doodads, and widgets strewn about for projects I’m working on.

Concurrently during the geekery of my youth, I discovered my passion for history. Also during my youth, I served as the score keeper and assistant coach of the softball team at my middle school. It was during this time I learned about working with kids and teaching. So during my senior year in high school when I was contemplating what I wanted to do with my life, I decide to take my passion for history and put it to use as a teacher. I then attended Chandler-Gilbert Community College, followed by Arizona State University. During my time at ASU, I worked at a high school for students with emotional disabilities and wasn’t scared away from the profession.

My next education job led me to a teaching position in Phoenix, where the technology offerings were limited. During this time, I used my Nokia 8800 phone to control my PowerPoint. My students thought that was crazy. I then proceeded to get married and moved to Winslow, AZ. At this stop, my computer expertise was utilized extensively. I had a SMART Board. Our school also implemented PowerSchool. On top of that I was the stopgap IT guy that teachers came to to troubleshoot their technology. Towards the end of my second year there, there was talk about creating a position to do basically what I was doing half the time, training teachers about technology. I WANTED THAT JOB! (Un)Fortunately though, my wife was accepted to Georgetown University. So we packed up, moved to the DC area, and I started teaching with DCPS.

Now that our time in DC is up, we are considering moving which brought another job search. I also discovered the title of my dream job, Academic Technology Specialist. Not the IT guy, but the guy who shows you how to use your SMART Board, use your iPad, or other cool tech gadgets. The drawback for me though, I don’t have any technology credentials other than the experience I have using it in the classroom. When I sat down though and thought about all my ideas I’ve done or would like to do with technology in my classroom, the more I want to be an Academic Tech Specialist. So the other reason for this blog is for some school district to take a chance on me.

So proceeding forward, I plan to talk about things I’ve done, with reviews and how to guides, hypothetical ideas that I haven’t tried yet, cool websites and other social media things to follow, and possible other philosophical musings about the state of education, board games, philosophy, the mismanagement of bullpens, the possibility of the 4 man rotation, and other things. But mostly tech stuff. Teachers, I don’t claim to know everything but if you had questions you want to pose or if there are things you have done with tech in your classrooms please email howtoedtech@gmail.com So my first review should be up in a couple days: Adobe Standard X and the possibilities it opens in your classroom.

Power On!

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